Access to Face Recognition Search of Moscow Cameras System Is For Sale

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Access to Face Recognition Search of Moscow Cameras System Is For Sale
Short Title In Moscow Access to Face Recognition Search of the City Cameras System Is Possible To Be Bought For 200$
Location Moscow, Russia
Date November 2020

Solove Harm Surveillance, Secondary Use, Disclosure
Information Location, Identifying, Behavioral, Contact
Threat Actors Moscow's Department of Technology, Moscow authorities

Individuals
Affected People in Moscow
High Risk Groups Females
Tangible Harms

In Russia $200 can buy you access to a face surveillance search of the governments 105,000 camera system on a photo of anyone you want, without any questions asked.

Description

With more than 105,000 cameras, Moscow boasts one of the world's most comprehensive Surveillance systems. The authorities claim that its aim is to cut crime and help the city enforce coronavirus lockdown restrictions. However, the access to the system was found to be used for financial profit. Secondary Use

In November 2020 a volunteer for a digital rights group investigating leaks in Moscow's pervasive surveillance system sent over a picture of herself to an organisation that was offering access to Moscow’s face recognition cameras for only 200$.

All it took were a couple of messages, with no questions asked about how the results would be used or by whom. She was forwarded a detailed list of all the addressed in the Russian capital where she had been spotted by cameras over the previous month.

Recurring locations gave a clear picture of her home, work and daily habits - handy for anyone with ill intent, be it a burglar or an abusive ex-partner. This is an example of Disclosure.

Moscow's Department of Technology (DIT), which manages the surveillance programme, said reports of illegal access to the system were rare and sent for investigation. The incident is now under police investigation.

Rights activists say cameras have been also used to monitor political rallies.Secondary Use

Breakdown

Threat: Moscow authorities watching people through 105000 cameras all over the city
At-Risk group: People in Moscow
Harm: Surveillance
Secondary Consequences: not known

Threat: Moscow's Department of Technology offering access to face recognition cameras for financial profit and for monitoring political rallies, while the system was built to help cut crime and enforce COVID lockdown restrictions
At-Risk group: People in Moscow
Harm: Secondary Use
Secondary Consequences: not known

Threat: Moscow's Department of Technology giving access to face recognition cameras to anyone who is paying
At-Risk group: People in Moscow
Harm: Disclosure
Secondary Consequences: not known

Laws and Regulations

Sources

https://news.trust.org/item/20201109090922-3k4a5/